Hack Education Weekly News: The Great LAUSD iPad Saga Continues

Hack Education Weekly News: The Great LAUSD iPad Saga Continues

Well well well, LAUSD. You have demonstrated again and again and again and again how not to implement a district-wide 1-1 technology initiative. Congratulations. And now you've shown as well how the back-room deals that lead to Pearson getting its textbooks into classrooms and onto students' iPads really work. Excellent. Thanks. Meanwhile, lots of drama around NCLB and the Common Core this week, with Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal suing the Obama Administration for trying to implement a national curriculum. [...]

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Most Anticipated Back-to-School Technology (2014)

Most Anticipated Back-to-School Technology (2014)

It's that time again: my (fifth!!) annual "Most Anticipated Back-to-School Technology" survey results. Every year I do this, the results are weirdly fascinating, and of course, completely unscientific. But it is what it is: a snapshot from those who follow me on Twitter and who care enough to fill out a quick form. Once again, congratulations to Google and Apple who continue to hold the largest portion of the ed-tech mind-share. And congrats to the learning management system, which simply refuses to die. [...]

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Hack Education Weekly News: #Ferguson

Hack Education Weekly News: #Ferguson

Think Ferguson isn't an education-related issue? LOL. Think Ferguson isn't "newsworthy"? WOW. In related news, the social networks of white Americans are 93% white. "Mansplaining" enters the dictionary. There were lots of examples this week that highlight the school-to-prison pipeline, (fears of) violence on campuses, and the increasing surveillance and control of students - on- and offline. Meanwhile, support for the Common Core is down. Teen pregnancy rates are down. And the Horizon Report now looks at what's on the horizon for libraries. [...]

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Hack Education Weekly News: Carpe Diem

Hack Education Weekly News: Carpe Diem

This has been an incredibly painful week: the death of Robin Williams, the death of Michael Brown. Although many educators have been silent about the latter (they've been more able to share their thoughts on the former -- interesting), I think we must address the systemic racism that permeates our institutions. We cannot be silent. This week, the National Center for Education Statistics said that in the fall, the majority of students in the US will be "minority." So yeah. We gotta talk about race and ethnicity. We gotta address white (educator) privilege. In other news: Desire2Learn raised another huge round of investment. Because LMS. Imagine Learning is partnering with Scantron. Because Scantron. Michelle Rhee is stepping down as head of StudentsFirst. Because political aspirations. [...]

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Google Classroom and the Teaching Machine

Google Classroom and the Teaching Machine

Some thoughts, inspired by a couple of sentences in Edsurge's coverage of the "new" Google Classroom on the histories of the technologies that drive automation and assessment. I'm working on a chapter for Teaching Machines on intelligence testing and intelligent machines. But reading Edsurge, I was really struck by how automation and assessment and testing are intertwined (and frankly, utterly unexamined by those in ed-tech who, as always, act as though everything is NEW NEW NEW). [...]

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Intelligence and Influence: On Education Ranking Systems

Intelligence and Influence: On Education Ranking Systems

I feel like I'm writing a lot of these posts lately: half-articulated ideas because something I see on the Interwebz prompts me to think through (publicly here on this blog) some of the ideas from my book. Today's post tries to weave together my appearance on Michael Petrilli's list of "The Top Twitter Feeds in Education Policy," with my thoughts on Klout, with my thoughts on intelligence testing and ideology. Kanye shrug. [...]

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