Hack Education Weekly News:

Hack Education Weekly News: "Gainful Employment" Rules and More

This week was full of weird MOOC-related news. It's like MOOCs -- hell, much of ed-tech -- are still trying so desperately to stay relevant and to not sound completely a) evil or b) full of shit. Speaking of full shit, the Obama Administration released the latest version of its "gainful employment" rules, and no one is happy. Well, maybe the lobbyists are semi-happy. I mean, they dumped enough money into the effort. So yeah, for-profit education, NCAA-related news (also for-profit education, no?), and startup stuff. It's a healthy, vibrant sector we got goin' on here. [...]

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Hack Education Weekly News: UNC Cheaters and Keene State Rioters

Hack Education Weekly News: UNC Cheaters and Keene State Rioters

It's school pride week, I guess, except not really. Students at Keene State rioted at the annual pumpkin festival. A report was published documenting 18 years of academic fraud involving student athletes (and professors and coaches and administrators) at the University of North Carolina. The University of Guelph has filed a trademark on "OpenEd." Boston Public Schools want campus cops to use pepper spray. The University of South Florida and schools in New Jersey and Maine freak out for no reason over Ebola. Meanwhile, another school shooting... [...]

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Hack Education Weekly News: Yes, #Gamergate is an Ed-Tech Issue

Hack Education Weekly News: Yes, #Gamergate is an Ed-Tech Issue

Ebola ebola ebola. MOOCs MOOCs MOOCs. College sports scandals. Violence against women online. More violence against women online. Denial about violence against women online. Security vulnerabilities. Funding for silly things. You know, the usual. Or at least, these are some of the major trends in education over the last few weeks. Strong work, team. [...]

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Hack Education Weekly News: Malala Yousafzai Wins the Nobel Peace Prize

Hack Education Weekly News: Malala Yousafzai Wins the Nobel Peace Prize

This week sucked. It wasn't a great week to be a woman in tech or a woman in ed-tech. So I was pleased this morning when I woke up to the news that Malala Yousafzai has won the Nobel Peace Prize. Lots of other news this week: students strike in Philadelphia in support of their teachers; startups get money; Bill Fitzgerald scrutinizes their Terms of Service; tech companies pledge to not do bad things with students' data but I'm like "suuuuuuuuure." [...]

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Hack Education Weekly News: Iris Scans, Ebola Panic, and Student Protests

Hack Education Weekly News: Iris Scans, Ebola Panic, and Student Protests

Student protests at UC Berkeley, in Hong Kong, at BYU, at Colgate University, and in the Jefferson County Public Schools. Ebola scares in the Dallas area schools. Iris scans in the cafeterias at George Mason University. Educause seemed as awful as ever with the usual suspects spouting the usual claims about disruption and digital revolution. Uber wants to recruit teachers to drive UberXs. $40 million more for Remind, a free messaging startup. I don't understand this world at all. At. All. [...]

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Ed-Tech Imperialism and the XPRIZE for Global Learning

Ed-Tech Imperialism and the XPRIZE for Global Learning

Some first inklings of ideas I want to develop further: ed-tech as imperialism. This week's news about the XPRIZE helped reinforce things I'd already been weighing, namely via a conversation held in the 1980s between Paulo Freire and Seymour Papert. No two men have more influenced my work as an educator more than these two. And I'm struck by how they fail to communicate. It makes me think -- worriedly, I confess -- that perhaps there is no reconciliation between ed-tech and liberation. Because if I had to choose one over the other, it would be freedom and not computers. [...]

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